Monday, 18 February 2013

Requesting an elevator via email

Some Brazilian enthusiasts have hacked an ancient lift/elevator system with one goal in mind - the ability to send an email to call the lift to their level. Some of us thought the simply fitted an optocoupler and Arduino-related hardware to the local call button, however the hackers instead fitted an Arduino-controlled relay to the required contact in the lift control system. Furthermore the system can detect when the lift is at the required level and email the notification. Then the passenger can mozy on over to the car and start their ride. More in the following video:

 

Fascinating - click here for the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If Arduino is new to you, but you're not sure how to to start with it - then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

February 18, 2013

The "Garduino" garden automation system with Arduino

 In a quest for smarter garden automation and a successful vegetable garden, Edward Austin has created a fully-automated garden sprinkler control and monitoring system. It uses a wide variety of technologies - that all work well together. Soil moisture data from the garden is sent back to a main Arduino controller which can control water flow, and also send various forms of data including temperature, soil moisture levels and system status to the cloud-based cosm service via the Electric Imp. This allows monitoring from almost any Internet-connected device.  Edward's system is an example of what's possible with some planning and the right parts - and demonstrated in the following video:

 

For more information visit the project website. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To simplify relay control, Edward used our RELAY8: Arduino shield that allows you to drive up to 8 relays from your Arduino using just 2 I/O pins with this shield. It communicates with your board using I2C, so you can even stack several shields together to drive 16, 24, or more outputs! Includes back-EMF protection and works with a wide range of relays. Perfect for home automation projects! For more information and to order, click here

February 18, 2013

Distributed cache RAM for Ardusat nodes

 Enthusiast Philip Stevens has recently published his efforts on modifying a cache RAM system used with Arduino boards to work with a range of Ardusat Arduino-compatible client nodes. Doing this allows each client to access a unique 32 kByte of XRAM as well as their own 2 kByte of internal SRAM. If the whole thing seems a little "over your head", don't worry as it's all explained in great detail. 

It's a fascinating example of how Arduino boards can communicate with each other, and shows what's happening inside the ArduSat. So for more information visit Philip's interestingproject website

 Have you heard about ArduSat? It's the first open-platform low Earth orbit satellite system that allows any member of the public to design and run their own space-based applications. The project was originally funded by KickStarter donors and is now progressing very well. Participants can create their own Arduino sketches to run inside the satellite, taking advantage of the on-board sensors to record results and generate data. The hardware contains the equivalent of sixteen Arduinos which can run up to around 12 sketches concurrently. Freetronics co-founder Jonathan Oxer gives us more details in the following video:

 

We're really proud to be part of the ArduSat vision of allowing anyone to run their own experiments in space, so as well as being the payload hardware partner - we also have ArduSat prototyping modules for sale that allow you to recreate your own hardware for testing before uploading the sketch to the ArduSat system, or for your own projects. For more information about the ArduSat, visittheir website

February 18, 2013

DIY 3D Laser Spirograph with Arduino

 At the WTH blog they've demonstrated a fun project that creates some amazing lighting effects with a range of inexpensive parts. It's a laser spirograph - that consists of three enclosed cooling fans (similar to those found in PC power supplies) that each have a small mirror on one of their blades. The fans are mounted in a way that when a low-power laser is pointed inside the beam can reflect via all three mirrors as the fans rotate. With the Arduino controlling the fan speed via PWM - the effects are fascinating - for example:

 

Fantastic. If you make your own version, be careful not to point the laser at anyone eye! Click here for the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If Arduino is new to you, but you're not sure how to to start with it - then the best way to learn is with out new Experimenter's Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don't leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words - this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

February 14, 2013

Make a garage door-opener with Arduino and an iPhone

If you're looking for a way of remotely-controlling an Arduino via your iPhone, but don't want to write the HTML for the interface... then this may be an option for you. The team from Red Frog Software have published an Instructable that details how to interface an electric garage door system with an Ethernet-enabled Arduino board. This setup can then be controlled over the Internet using their iPhone app. If you're in a hurry, it's simple and it works.

To get started on your own version, click here. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To get started with your own Internet-enabled projects, use our Freetronics EtherTen - theArduino Uno-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

... or for more program space, I/O ports consider the Freetronics EtherMega - the Arduino Mega2560-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

February 14, 2013

The simple oscilloscope with Arduino

 Once again engineering student Rui Santos has published an interesting Arduino tutorial, which covers building a very simple oscilloscope. We realise that this won't give you the most accurate piece of test equipment - however it's a fun way to learn about Arduino and especially analogue inputs, as well as working with processing on a PC. Great for beginners, cheaply monitoring analogue sensor outputs or showing off to someone that you're encouraging into the world of electronics. Check out Rui's demonstration video below:

 

Well done! To recreate your own, visit the project page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you're new to Arduino, the first step is a solid board for your projects - our Freetronics Eleven - the Arduino-Uno compatible with low-profile USB socket, onboard prototyping space and easy to view LEDs:


February 14, 2013

Tutorial: Control devices over the Internet with Arduino

 Controlling devices over the Internet is certainly possible, and there are an almost infinite number of methods to make it happen. One simple yet effective method is using Ethernet-enabled Arduino boards and various data protocols. Once example of this has been published by Instructables user "akellyirl". Their tutorial describes how to control Arduino digital outputs over the Internet via UDP (user datagram protocol). After reviewing this you should be up to speed on Arduino and Internet-control in no time. Furthermore, a short demonstration follows in this video:

 

To get started, visit the tutorial page. And for more, we're on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To get started with your own Internet-enabled projects, use our Freetronics EtherTen - theArduino Uno-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

... or for more program space, I/O ports consider the Freetronics EtherMega - the Arduino Mega2560-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

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